Education

Education

Education has benefits to individuals and society. A fundamental goal of education is to equip individuals to reach their potential as members of a just democratic society.

Young people who leave school early risk unemployment and social disadvantage. They’re likely to experience long periods out of work and when they are employed their jobs are likely be low-paid and low-skilled – often casual and part time.

Of those who leave school early, up to a third are unemployed in the following year and continue to have difficulties over the next six years.[1] Young people most at risk of current and future social and long-term economic disadvantage are those 15-19 year olds who are unemployed or not looking for work and are not in any form of education and training.  

Early intervention and prevention approaches to early school leaving requires additional resources and responsibilities, which cannot be simply added to existing teaching responsibilities. Youth workers are well placed to support young people to remain engaged in education.  There is a range of support mechanisms in schools where youth workers can partner to ensure young people’s social, emotional and educational needs are being met.

There have been major changes to education requirements for young people in the ACT with amendments to the Education Act from 1 January 2010. Previously, compulsory school age ending was 15 years of age. All young people are now required to remain in education until completing Year 10. Following this, they will have to participate full time (at least 25 hours per week) in education, training or employment until completing Year 12 (or equivalent) or reaching the age of 17, whichever comes first.

Students who have not turned 17 and who are looking to undertake work-related training or employment after Year 10 will need to seek an Approval Statement from ACT Department of Education and Training) DET to do so. This is required to ensure the training or employment meets the new legislative requirements and the Department’s guidelines. The changes will not affect students who left school in 2009, either at the end of Year 10 or aged 15; or who are planning to continue in education until Year 12.

More information can be obtained from the Department of Education (DET) website www.det.act.gov.au/major_changes_to_education_requirements or by contacting DET on [email protected] or (02) 6205 2254.


Overview

Education has benefits to individuals and society. A fundamental goal of education is to equip individuals to reach their potential as members of a just democratic society.

 

Young people who leave school early risk unemployment and social disadvantage. They’re likely to experience long periods out of work and when they are employed their jobs are likely be low-paid and low-skilled – often casual and part time.

 

Of those who leave school early, up to a third are unemployed in the following year and continue to have difficulties over the next six years.[1] Young people most at risk of current and future social and long-term economic disadvantage are those 15-19 year olds who are unemployed or not looking for work and are not in any form of education and training.  

 

Early intervention and prevention approaches to early school leaving requires additional resources and responsibilities, which cannot be simply added to existing teaching responsibilities. Youth workers are well placed to support young people to remain engaged in education.  There is a range of support mechanisms in schools where youth workers can partner to ensure young people’s social, emotional and educational needs are being met.

 

There have been major changes to education requirements for young people in the ACT with amendments to the Education Act from 1 January 2010. Previously, compulsory school age ending was 15 years of age. All young people are now required to remain in education until completing Year 10. Following this, they will have to participate full time (at least 25 hours per week) in education, training or employment until completing Year 12 (or equivalent) or reaching the age of 17, whichever comes first.

 

Students who have not turned 17 and who are looking to undertake work-related training or employment after Year 10 will need to seek an Approval Statement from ACT Department of Education and Training) DET to do so. This is required to ensure the training or employment meets the new legislative requirements and the Department’s guidelines. The changes will not affect students who left school in 2009, either at the end of Year 10 or aged 15; or who are planning to continue in education until Year 12.

More information can be obtained from the Department of Education (DET) website www.det.act.gov.au/major_changes_to_education_requirements or by contacting DET on [email protected] or (02) 6205 2254.


[1] Government of Western Australia.  2005  Creating The Future For Our Young People:  Raising The School Leaving Age. www.det.wa.edu.au/schoolleavingage/docs/LeavingAgeConsultationReport.pdf

Ways of Working

Tips For Working with School Communities

This information is provided to help community organisations promote their programs by developing better links and partnerships with schools.

The first step is to work out what your service wants to achieve by working with schools and whether it can cope with the extra demands on the service that may result.  For example, if you’re aiming to encourage young people in your area to access your service, will your service be able to cater for the extra numbers (consider existing programs, volunteers, administration, resources)?

Some Tips for Working Within the School Community

  • All schools are different. Schools may have different interests, priorities and resources in respect to your service.
  • Get to know those closest to your service.
  • Decide what sort of support you can offer schools (ie. running groups, health promotion, alternative education, recreation) before approaching them to find out whether they would be interested in your service.
  • Schools are bound by policy, curriculum, reporting and learning outcomes. Find out about these and consider whether what you offer can support these in any way. If you can demonstrate support for these you’re more attractive to schools.
  • All high schools have a Pastoral Care Coordinator and a Youth Support Worker in School who could be your nominated contact person for that school. This may be your best contact point, particularly if you can address him or her by name.
  • It’s important to remember schools are busy places and teachers are stretched to fit everything into the school day.
  • Teachers generally plan their programs ahead. Term 4 is usually a good time to discuss opportunities for the following year.
  • Schools receive a great deal of information to distribute to families. Find out how each school prefers information to be presented, and keep it simple.
  • Schools are required to ensure visitors/volunteers working with students meet certain requirements. For example, appropriate accreditation/experience for the role, and possibly police checks. Find out what the requirements are for your involvement in the school.

Successful Links with Schools

Better links between schools and services result when:

    • Schools have evidence the service is a ‘student / young person safe’ environment.
    • Face-to-face discussions are held between school and service staff.
    • Service proposals are flexible and cater for school needs.
    • Teachers can see the benefits for their students.
    • The service link adds value to the school program, e.g. teacher training, resources and ongoing service-school links.
    • Any additional workload is rewarded by the benefits to the service and the school.
    • The service provides quality programs.

Department of Education and Training, ACT Government

Guidance and Counselling Service


All students in ACT Government schools have access to a school counsellor. School counsellors aim to assist students with educational, social, emotional or behavioural needs, either individually or in groups and can work collaboratively with families, school communities and external agencies. School counsellors are required to be registered or be eligible for registration with the ACT Psychology Board, and have completed teaching qualifications.

School counsellors may assist students through:

 

  • Psycho educational assessment and recommendations for support;
  • Counselling (individual and group);
  • Referrals to and liaison with community agencies and other professionals;
  • In-servicing and consulting with school staff;
  • Parent liaison;
  • Parent education and discussion groups;
  • Curriculum development;
  • Mediation and negotiation; and
  • Confidential discussions.

School counsellors can be contacted directly through ACT Government schools. The assistant manager and senior counsellors can be contacted through Student Support Services.

Phone: (02) 6205 6925

Fax: (02) 6205 7623

 

Pastoral Care Coordinators

 

All ACT Government high schools have a pastoral care coordinator who coordinates school student welfare and pastoral care programs; and works with the Youth Support Worker. Individual schools should be contacted in regard to how these positions are being rolled out.

 

Youth Education Support (YES)

 

Aims to re-engage young people in education and support their participation in school and community life. Works with young people, aged 11 – 15 years, their families and other agencies to support skills building and a return to education. Participation is voluntary. Referrals required.

Phone:        (02) 6205 6075 (Northside)

                    (02) 6205 6074 (Southside)

Web: www.det.act.gov.au

 

Youth Support Workers in Schools


Youth Support Workers in Schools represent a contact person that is accessible to young people, youth and community services during school hours.

 

Youth Support Workers in Schools can be excellent gateways into schools, facilitating partnerships with youth and community services and greatly enhancing the access of young people to a range of resources available to them. Increasingly, schools are not being seen as merely sites for education, but as venues that facilitate the health and wellbeing of young people.

 

All Youth Support Workers in Schools provide information, referrals and personal support.  Some youth support workers can provide drop in space, emergency relief, peer education, advocacy, personal and crisis support, outreach to youth services, groups and recreational activities.

 

To contact a Youth Support Worker directly, contact the individual school and ask for the Youth Support Worker. For more information about the program, contact the Youth Support Workers in Schools Coordinator.
Phone: (02) 6205 8347

 

Disability, Housing and Community Services, ACT Government

 

Schools as Communities Program


A voluntary program that aims to improve social and educational outcomes for young people by creating working relationships between families, communities and schools. There are currently seven Community Outreach Workers based in eight primary schools and two high schools (Kaleen and Calwell) across Canberra. 

 

The program conducts community development initiatives and provides family support including crisis intervention, mediation, advocacy, referral, transportation to community services for appointments and provide individual support.

 

Students and families are referred to the program by teachers, counsellors, community organisations or through self-referral.  Students and parents can arrange to see a worker by dropping in at the school, phoning for an appointment or requesting a home visit.

Phone: (02) 6205 5681 (Schools as Communities Team Leader)

Web: www.dhcs.act.gov.au/ocyfs/services/schools_as_communities

 

Youth Connection

Department of Disability, Housing and Community Services

A short to medium term non-crisis outreach service that aim to support young people aged 12 – 16 experiencing problematic attendance.

Phone: (02) 6207 4528

Web: www.dhcs.act.gov.au/ocyfs/services/young_people#YConnection

 

Department of Education, Science and Training, Australian Government

 

National Chaplaincy Programme

The chaplain’s role is to increase the provision of pastoral care for students, supporting their wellbeing, and their ability to deal with personal issues. The program aims to assist schools and their communities to support the spiritual wellbeing of their students.

 

Each school and its community will decide on the religious affiliation of the school chaplain and the nature of services provided.  However, students are not obliged to participate, and parents and students are to be informed about the availability and the voluntary nature of chaplaincy services.

 

Thirty-three Government and Non-Government schools in the ACT are now providing chaplaincy services through the program. Chaplains can be contacted through individual schools. The website contains details of these schools and more information about the program.

 

Web: http://www.deewr.gov.au/Pages/default.aspx

 

Government High Schools

 

School

Phone

Web

Location

Alfred Deakin High School 

(02) 6205 5566

www.adhs.act.edu.au

Denison St, Deakin

Amaroo School 

 

(02) 6205 2808

www.amaroos.act.edu.au

Katherine Ave, Amaroo

Belconnen High School 

 

(02) 6205 6844

www.blch.act.edu.au

Murranji St, Hawker 

Black Mountain School 

 

(02) 6205 6377

www.bms.act.edu.au

Dryanda St, O’Connor

Calwell High School 

 

(02) 6205 6833

www.calwellhs.act.edu.au/

Casey Drive, Calwell

Campbell High School 

 

(02) 6205 6344

www.campbellhs.act.edu.au

Treloar Cres, Campbell

Canberra High School 

 

(02) 6205 7000

www.canberrahs.act.edu.au

Bindubi St, Macquarie

Caroline Chisholm High School 

 

(02) 6205 7277

www.cchs.act.edu.au

Hambridge St, Chisholm

Gold Creek School 

 

(02) 6205 1814

www.goldcreek.act.edu.au

Kelleway Ave, Nicholls

Kaleen High School 

(02) 6205 5811

www.kaleenhs.act.edu.au

Baldwin Dr, Kaleen

Kambah High School 

 

(02) 6205 6933

www.kambahhs.act.edu.au

O’Hallora Crt, Kambah

Lanyon High School 

 

(02) 6205 7676

www.lanyonhs.act.edu.au

Heidelber St, Condor

Lyneham High School 

(02) 6205 6399

www.lynehamhs.act.edu.au

Goodwin St, Lyneham

Melba High School 

 

(02) 6205 6711

www.melbahs.act.edu.au

Conley Drive, Melba

Melrose High School 

 

(02) 6205 7588

www.melrosehs.act.edu.au

Marrs St, Pearce

Stromlo High School 

 

(02) 6205 6166

www.stromlohs.act.edu.au

Badimara St, Warramanga

Telopea Park School 

 

(02) 6205 5599

www.telopea.act.edu.au

New South Wales Cres, Barton

Wanniassa School 

 

(02) 6205 6200

www.wans.act.edu.au

Wheeler Cres, Wanniassa

Woden School 

 

(02) 6205 5966

www.thewodens.act.edu.au/

Denison St, Deakin

 

 

ACT Government Colleges (Year 11 – 12)

 

School

Phone

Web

Location

Canberra College – Weston 

 

(02) 6205 5777

www.canberrac.act.edu.au/

Fremantle Dr, Stirling

Canberra College – Woden 

 

(02) 6205 5777

www.canberrac.act.edu.au/

Launceston St, Phillip

Copland College

 

(02) 6205 7622

www.coplandc.act.edu.au/

Copland Dr, Melba

Dickson College

 

(02) 6205 6455

www.dicksonc.act.edu.au/

Phillip Ave, Dickson

Erindale College

 

(02) 6205 8111

www.erindalec.act.edu.au

McBryde Cres, Wanniassa

Hawker College

 

(02) 6205 7744

www.hawkerc.act.edu.au/

Murranji St, Hawker

Lake Ginninderra College

 

(02) 6205 7099

www.lakeonline.act.edu.au/

Emu Bank, Belconnen

Lake Tuggeranong College

 

(02) 6205 6222

www.ltc.act.edu.au

Cowlishaw St, Tuggeranong

Narrabundah College

 

(02) 6205 6999

www.narrabundahc.act.edu.au/

Jerrabomberra Ave, Narrabundah

 

 

 

 

 

The following services also provide relevant programs:

  • Access 10 Program (Alternative Education)
  • Bungee (Mental Health)
  • CCCares (Alternative Education)
  • Children and Young People Focus Worker – DVCS (Youth Support)
  • Children and Young People’s Workers – CRCC (Youth Support)
  • CYCLOPS (Young Carers)
  • Galilee Education Service (Alternative Education)
  • Learning For Life Program (Youth Support)
  • LYNX (Youth Support)
  • Menslink (Youth Support)
  • Messengers Program (Art and Recreation)
  • Mental Illness Education ACT (Mental Health)
  • Multicultural Youth Services (Multicultural)
  • Northside Community Services (Youth Support)
  • Northside High School Student Support Centre (Alternative Education)
  • Open Family Australia (Youth Support)
  • PASS Homework Program (Multicultural)

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